Life Technologies Foundation CDC Foundation
VIDEOS
  1. HOW WE WOULD HANDLE A GLOBAL PANDEMIC
    What would happen if a pandemic did occur? Is our government prepared and how would we find a vaccine?
  2. GENOMIC MEDICINE
    Sequencing technology changes the lives of teenage twins whose medical disorder remained a mystery for years.
  3. SOLVING OUTBREAKS QUICKLY
    Learn how Ion semiconductor sequencing technology has helped identify the pathogens behind recent outbreaks in a matter of hours instead of weeks.
  4. GLOBAL DISEASE DETECTIVES
    CDC global health leadership brings the world's leading public health experts to a Guatemala cave, where rabid bats threaten human health.
  5. BREAKING THE MOLD
    Meet the man behind the latest developments in gene technology, Jonathan Rothberg, Founder & CEO, Ion Torrent.
  6. RESPONDING TO OUTBREAKS
    An outbreak of the Ebola virus hits in western Uganda and caused dozens of illnesses or deaths. In this video a team of investigators from the CDC Special Pathogens Branch travels to Uganda.
  7. THE SITUATION ROOM
    European E. coli outbreak linked to sprouts. Outbreak has killed 31, nearly 3,000 sick. Genome tool helps I.D. the deadly bacteria in hours.
FAST FACTS:
About Life Technologies
  1. Life Technologies provided the analytical instruments to help the CDC identify the H1N1 outbreak in 2009.
  2. Scientists used the Ion PGM™ to quickly identify the E. coli (Germany) and Klebsiella (Netherlands) outbreaks this year.
  3. Several Life Technologies tests (assays) are FDA-approved to identify various pathogens in animals and the environment.
  4. Investigators routinely use Life Technologies products to solve crimes, and prevent human trafficking.
  5. 90% of U.S. labs researching new treatments and cures rely on Life Technologies products for their daily work.
  6. Researchers are using Life Technologies DNA sequencing instruments to develop new sources of biofuels.
About CDC
  1. CDC responded to about 750 health threats in the last two years.
  2. 75% of emerging diseases in humans are passed from animals to people.
  3. On average, the CDC investigates one new contagious disease per year.
  4. Scientists who are part of CDC's Epidemic Intelligence Service (EIS) must go through a 2-year training program to become EIS Officers or "disease detectives".
  5. The protective gear worn by CDC scientists is nicknamed "blue suits" because they were once blue, although they are actually orange today.
  6. CDC scientists conduct research on airborne germs that have no known treatment or cure.
  7. You can help CDC respond to large-scale emergencies by making a gift to the CDC Foundation's Emergency Response Fund
CDC STANDS AT THE FOREFRONT TO PROTECT PUBLIC HEALTH AROUND THE WORLD
FIGHTING GERMAN E. COLI OUTBREAK IN REAL-TIME
It took scientists just three days to solve the deadly E. coli outbreak in Germany this summer (it takes up to two weeks on traditional instruments). Using the Ion Personal Genome Machine (PGM™), they decoded the bacterium's genetic information in just two hours, as reported by CNN, and used the data to develop a test to screen food samples in less than a week. Here's how they did it.
Stage 1 Stage 2 Stage 3 Stage 4 Stage 51 Stage 6
May 29, 2011 May 30, 2011 June 1, 2011 June 2, 2011 June 3, 2011 June 6, 2011
Read the E. coli 0104:H4 study published in the New England Journal of Medicine.
Guatemala Uganda Uganda
CDC TRAVERSES THE GLOBE IN RESPONSE TO HEALTH THREATS
A worldwide outbreak like the one depicted in the film Contagion is possible, says the CDC. Deadly pandemics can emerge at any time. Fortunately, the agency's investigators are ready 24/7 to respond to such global health threats. Aided by the most advanced technology available, CDC investigators work to control outbreaks and save lives around the world. Explore the map below to learn where the CDC has been active in the field.
Videos |  Outbreaks 2009 |  Outbreaks 2010 |  CDC Staff Locations
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Blog
SAVING LIVES
Learn how semiconductor technology's speed helps solve outbreaks.
more
Learn more about the CDC's efforts to address a real-life contagion.
more
How to prepare for a public health emergency.
more
PROTECT YOURSELF
  1. Avoid close contact
    Members of the public should avoid close contact with people who are sick. When you are sick, keep your distance from others to protect them from getting sick too.
  2. Stay home when you are sick
    If possible, stay home from work, school, and errands when you are sick. You will help prevent others from catching your illness.
  3. Cover your mouth and nose
    Cover your mouth and nose with a tissue or your sleeve when coughing or sneezing. It may prevent those around you from getting sick.
  4. Clean your hands
    Washing your hands often will help protect you from germs. If soap and water are not available, use an alcohol-based hand rub.
  5. Avoid touching your eyes, nose or mouth
    Germs are often spread when a person touches something that is contaminated with germs and then touches his or her eyes, nose, or mouth.
IN THE NEWS
  1. NEW TECHNOLOGY HELPS FIGHT DEADLY OUTBREAKS
    "...both groups used it [the Personal Genome Machine] and literally had the sequence before they got their other machines warmed up..."
    more
  2. TEST SHOWS PROMISE IN E. COLI SCREENING
    A new test developed by a unit of biotech company Life Technologies has shown success in quickly pinpointing the strain of E. coli...
    more
  3. GENE PROBE YIELDS E. COLI CLUE
    The culprit behind Europe's deadly E. coli outbreak appears to be an evolved and extremely toxic version of a bug first identified in Münster, Germany, in 2001....
    more
  4. CLINICAL SEQUENCING NEWS
    Münster Team Sequences Klebsiella Outbreak on Ion Torrent PGM™, Enables Development of PCR Test...
    more
  5. DESKTOP DNA DECODER TAKES ON DEADLY E. COLI STRAIN
    BGI's use of the Ion Torrent machine, known as the PGM™, is one of the first real-life applications of that technology...
    more
  6. EUROPE E. COLI STRAIN HIGHLY TOXIC, UNKNOWN
    The World Health Organization said the E. coli bacteria responsible for the outbreak in Europe is a highly toxic strain that has never been seen before...
    more
  7. SEQUENCING KILLER E. COLI REVEALS NEW
    Ion Torrent's desktop sequencer can sequence a sample of DNA in a couple of hours, rather than the weeks...
    more
GLOBAL DISEASE DETECTIVES
Alternative content

CDC global health leadership brings the world's leading public health experts to a Guatemala cave, where rabid bats threaten human health. Elsewhere, CDC community workers keep a health watch over Kenya's poor; while in China, CDC scientists protect babies from a mysterious outbreak. These examples of CDC at work in the world help protect America and all from disease threats that respect no borders.
RESPONDING TO OUTBREAKS
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An outbreak of the Ebola virus hits in western Uganda and caused dozens of illnesses or deaths. In RESPONDING TO OUTBREAKS, a team of investigators from the CDC Special Pathogens Branch travels to Uganda. They work to bring the outbreak under control and learn more about the reservoir hosts for the Ebola and Marburg viruses.
BREAKING THE MOLD
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THE SITUATION ROOM
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SOLVING OUTBREAKS QUICKLY
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HOW WE WOULD HANDLE A GLOBAL PANDEMIC
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GENOMIC MEDICINE
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GUATEMALA
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UGANDA
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CHINA
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MINNESOTA
Haemophilus influenzae type b
ILLINOIS
Carbapenem-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae outbreak
WEST VIRGINIA
Staphylococcus aureus
UNITED KINGDOM
Anthrax
Avian influenza (H5N1)
NETHERLANDS
Q fever
MEXICO
Legionella
UGANDA
Hepatitis E virus
Polio
Nodding disease
KENYA
Aflatoxin
Polio
DEMOCRATIC REPUBLIC OF THE CONGO
Lead poisoning
ZIMBABWE
Cholera
CAMEROON
Cholera
GHANA
Meningitis
SOUTH SUDAN
Nodding disease
HAITI
Cholera
Earthquake response

JAMAICA
Fungal investigation
TAJIKISTAN
Polio
THAILAND
Botulism
CDC STAFF LOCATIONS (2011)
Countries with CDC offices (physical presence)
Countries with CDC assigned staff only
Countries supported by CDC research, collaborations or technical assistance (no staff of physical presence)